eLife

eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. It is launched with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, and the Max Planck Society in November 2012. eLife represents a new model of scientific publishing, designed to meet the needs of scientists in life sciences and biomedicine in a better way. This includes free, immediate, online access to scientific articles; rapid, fair, and constructive review; and innovation in content presentation – in short, a journal for scientists, run by scientists. Initial decisions are made by eLife’s senior editors, and, if a submission is selected for further assessment, full peer review is overseen by eLife’s 175-member board of reviewing editors. The reviewing editor and reviewers consult once peer review comments are submitted, and provide a consolidated list of instructions to authors – eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming rounds of revision.

Publisher
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
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Optogenetics makes sterile mice fertile again

Scientists from the Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar) in Bonn, an Institute of the Max Planck Society, have succeeded for the first time in controlling the function of sperm by optogenetics. ...

Jan 20, 2015
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

New research unlocks a mystery of albinism

Newly published research provides the first demonstration of how a genetic mutation associated with a common form of albinism leads to the lack of melanin pigments that characterizes the condition.

Dec 16, 2014
popularity 4.4 / 5 (5) | comments 0

Proteins drive cancer cells to change states

A new study from MIT implicates a family of RNA-binding proteins in the regulation of cancer, particularly in a subtype of breast cancer. These proteins, known as Musashi proteins, can force cells into a ...

Dec 15, 2014
popularity 4.4 / 5 (7) | comments 0

Mutant protein takes babies' breath away

Babies start breathing in the womb, inhaling and exhaling irregularly at first, and then gradually more and more, until the day when they're born and have to do it all the time. But premature babies sometimes ...

Nov 24, 2014
popularity 4 / 5 (2) | comments 0