FDA issues supplement rules

June 23, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued new government standards for the manufacture of vitamins and dietary supplements.

The standards are intended to ensure that dietary supplements "are produced in a quality manner, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled," the FDA said Friday in a release.

"This rule helps to ensure the quality of dietary supplements so that consumers can be confident that the products they purchase contain what is on the label," said Commissioner of Food and Drugs Andrew C. von Eschenbach. "In addition, as a result of recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, by the end of the year, industry will be required to report all serious dietary supplement related adverse events to FDA."

The FDA said the agency is trying to prevent inclusion of the wrong ingredients; too much or too little of a dietary ingredient; contamination by substances such as natural toxins, bacteria, pesticides, glass, lead and other heavy metals; as well as improper packaging and labeling.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: A genetic marker indicates a desire for salty foods but people can still control 'salt-tooth'

Related Stories

Breast density in quantifying breast cancer risk

December 9, 2016

There is a strong connection between breast cancer and the high rate of breast density. These are cases wherein the patient has previously undergone mammography screening and been cleared as 'normal'. A subsequent diagnosis ...

Vitamin D deficiency is widely overestimated, doctors warn

November 11, 2016

Doctors are warning about vitamin D again, and it's not the "we need more" news you might expect. Instead, they say there's too much needless testing and too many people taking too many pills for a problem that few people ...

Recommended for you

Study shows blood products unaffected by drone trips

December 7, 2016

In what is believed to be the first proof-of-concept study of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers have determined that large bags of blood products, such as those transfused into patients every day, can maintain temperature ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.