Researcher Confirms Blueberries Can Improve Cardiovascular Health

June 24, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Nutritionists have long known that one of Maine’s most prized and prolific natural resources, the wild blueberry, provides health benefits that we’re still just learning about.

The Wild Blueberry Association of North America calls the Maine blueberry “nature’s antioxidant superfruit,” and cites its ability to reduce the risks for some of the nation’s leading killers and cripplers — heart disease, hypertension, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

Ongoing research by University of Maine professor of Dorothy Klimis-Zacas and colleagues focuses on the potential of blueberries to protect our blood vessels from degenerative conditions.

A leading authority on the health benefits of wild blueberries, Klimis-Zacas has broken new ground in documenting that a wild blueberry-enriched diet can protect the integrity of a thin but vital layer of cells lining the interior of blood vessels that controls constriction or dilation of arteries in the . The endothelium must remain flexible to properly accommodate the body’s need for increased blood flow and oxygen, or the need to restrict blood flow at times.

Damage by or disease can cause the to malfunction and constrict too often or too much, increasing blood pressure and pulse, which can be precursors for cardiovascular disease.

In other recent studies with the University of Patras in Greece, Klimis-Zacas found that a blueberry-enriched diet also improves in mice. Mice fed blueberries prior to testing fared better in learning skills and memory than mice fed a control, they reported in an article in the Journal of Behavioural Brain Research last year.

Klimis-Zacas and collaborators at the University of Milan in Italy also are exploring connections between wild blueberries and more than a dozen markers of potential health threats.

They have found that the high levels of antioxidants such as anthocyanins, the blue pigment coloring blueberries, introduced through regular consumption of wild or blueberry extracts, can protect DNA molecules and reduce both environmental and endogenous damage by approximately 30 percent.

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bredmond
Jun 24, 2010
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Mayday
not rated yet Jun 25, 2010
So how much blueberries does it take to produce the optimum health effects? I eat about a cup per day.
evolutionarily
not rated yet Jun 25, 2010
I also eat around a cup a day (often half mixed berries also). I have found getting frozen blueberries is a convenient and most economical way to do it, which I just make a shake with along with varies other goodies... Frozen however have up to ~30% lower *cyanins and related compounds (dont have a reference for this but google should find easily), but I just eat a little extra to make up the difference.

My Doctor, who is very passionate about staying up to date with the latest research, recommends a cup a day as about one of the best things you can do for your brain health.
ralph_wiggum
not rated yet Jun 25, 2010
All good and well but the emphasis should be on eating healthy non-/minimally processed foods all the time. Articles like this give people the impression that a handful of blueberries will make up for eating crap the rest of the day.

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