Body's bacteria affect atherosclerosis

October 18, 2010

New findings suggesting that bacteria in the mouth and/or intestine can affect the the outcome pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and lead to new treatment strategies, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

The results are to be published in the distinguished journal (PNAS).

"The causes of have recently become clearer, but we know less about why the in the arteries ruptures and contributes to clot formation," says Fredrik Bäckhed, researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy's Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.

Inflammation increases the risk of the plaque rupture in the arteries, but the underlying mechanisms for inflammation are not clear. Our bodies are home to ten times more bacteria than cells, and research in recent years has shown that our gut flora is altered in obesity , which over time may lead to cardiovascular disease. Poor dental health and periodontitis have also been linked to atherosclerosis, which would indicate that the bacteria in the mouth or gut could affect the condition.

"We tested the hypothesis that bacteria from the mouth and/or the gut could end up in the atherosclerotic plaque and thus contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease."

The researchers initially found that the number of bacteria in the plaque correlated with the number of white blood cells, a measure of inflammation. Next they used modern sequencing methods to determine the composition of the bacteria in the mouth, gut and arterial plaque of 15 patients, and in the mouth and gut of 15 healthy control subjects. They found that several bacteria were found in the atherosclerotic plaques and, primarily, the mouth, but also the gut, of the same patient and that the bacteria Pseudomonas luteola and Chlamydia pneumoniae were present in all atherosclerotic plaques. These results would suggest that the bacteria can enter the body from the mouth and gut and end up min the plaque where they ultimately may contribute toinflammation and rupture of the plaque. The researchers also found that some of the bacteria in the mouth and gut correlated with biomarkers associated with cardiovascular disease.

"Finding the same bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque as in the and of the same individual paves the way for new diagnosis and treatment strategies that work on the body's bacteria," says Bäckhed. "However, our findings must be backed up by larger studies, and a direct causal relationship established between the identified and atherosclerosis."

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not rated yet Oct 18, 2010
Oh, well done!
And did you read all about it here?-
not rated yet Oct 18, 2010
So get rid of these bacteria and you gain better health.
not rated yet Oct 19, 2010
So get rid of these bacteria and you gain better health.

Not quite! Even were it possible to do that, the result would be more harm than good .. we *need* those lil buggers! It's just that some might be in the wrong place!

Short of putting a cadaver in an autoclave, there is no way to rid the body of living bacteria .. and of course, if you did it to a living person, you'd end up with a cadaver anyway.
not rated yet Oct 19, 2010
I'm wondering just why it has taken soooooo many years for someone to look for bacteria in atherosclerosic plaque !!
Inflammation there has been known for a very long time ..
Or has culturing been done before ?
not rated yet Oct 19, 2010
It hasn't been sooooo many years!
You didn't read the link I posted.
Just because you didn't read about it on Physorg doesn't mean it didn't happen.
If you are interested this site will bring you up to date.

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