Study indicates that induced labor may not lower risk of infection or respiratory problems in newborns

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that suggest that induction of labor in patients who suffer a rupture of membranes between the 34th and 37th week of gestation (before the onset of labor) does not reduce the risk of infection or respiratory problems in the newborn.

"Our research indicates that in patients who underwent close monitoring, known as expectant management, versus those whose labor was induced, there was no difference in the risk for infection in the newborn, breathing problems in the newborn or caesarean section rates," said David van der Ham, MD, with the Maastricht University Medical Center, & Gynecology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands, and one of the study's authors. "Due to these findings, we suggested expectant management as opposed to induced labor when possible."

For the study, entitled Induction of Labor Versus Expectant Management in Women with Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes Between 34 and 37 Weeks– the PPROMEXIL-2 trial, van der Ham and his colleagues observed 536 women from January 2007 until September 2009, and 195 women from December 2009 until January 2011. The study was performed in a multicenter setting within the Dutch obstetric research consortium, in which 60 hospitals in the Netherlands collaborated. After 24 hours of ruptured membranes, patients were allocated to either immediate delivery or expectant management until 37 weeks of gestational age.

The results indicate that: expectant management prolonged for 3.5 days; the risk for neonatal sepsis (infection of the newborn) overall was low (3.6%) and did not differ between ; the risk for respiratory distress syndrome (breathing problems of the newborn) did not differ between treatment strategies; and rates were equal in both treatment strategies. Combined with results of all previous published trials there was no difference in the identified risks.

In addition to van der Ham, the study was conducted by Jantien van der Heijden and Hans van Beek, VieCuri Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Venlo, Netherlands; Brent Opmeer, Academic Medical Center, Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Christine Willekes and Jan Nijhuis, Maastricht University Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands; Twan Mulder, Maastricht University Medical Center, Pediatrics, Maastricht, Netherlands; Rob Moonen, Atrium Medical Center, Pediatrics, Heerlen, Netherlands; Marielle van Pampus, University Medical Center Groningen, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Groningen, Netherlands; Mariet Groenewout, University Medical Center Groningen, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Groningen, Netherlands; Gerald Mantel, Isala klinieken, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Zwolle, Netherlands; Anneke Kwee, Dutch consortium AMPHIA trial, Netherlands; Hajo Wildschut, Erasmus Medical Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Bettina Akerboom, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Obstetrics and , Dordrecht, Netherlands; and Ben Mol, Academic Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

More information: A copy of the abstract is available at www.smfmnewsroom.org/annual-meeting/2011-meeting-abstracts/

Provided by Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study finds residence in US a risk factor for preterm birth

Feb 09, 2012

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that duration of stay in the United States ...

Recommended for you

What are the chances that your dad isn't your dad?

Apr 16, 2014

How confident are you that the man you call dad is really your biological father? If you believe some of the most commonly-quoted figures, you could be forgiven for not being very confident at all. But how ...

New technology that is revealing the science of chewing

Apr 15, 2014

CSIRO's 3D mastication modelling, demonstrated for the first time in Melbourne today, is starting to provide researchers with new understanding of how to reduce salt, sugar and fat in food products, as well ...

After skin cancer, removable model replaces real ear

Apr 11, 2014

(HealthDay)—During his 10-year struggle with basal cell carcinoma, Henry Fiorentini emerged minus his right ear, and minus the hearing that goes with it. The good news: Today, the 56-year-old IT programmer ...

Italy scraps ban on donor-assisted reproduction

Apr 09, 2014

Italy's Constitutional Court on Wednesday struck down a Catholic Church-backed ban against assisted reproduction with sperm or egg donors that has forced thousands of sterile couples to seek help abroad.

User comments