The right combination: Overcoming drug resistance in cancer

June 1, 2012

Overactive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling has been linked to the development of cancer. Several drug therapies have been developed to treat these EGFR-associated cancers; however, many patients have developed resistance to these drugs and are therefore no longer responsive to drug treatment.

In a recent research article published in the , Goutham Narla and colleagues at Case Western Reserve University sought to better understand the molecular players in the EGFR signaling pathway in hopes of finding new drug targets for EGFR-associated cancers. Using cancerous human lung tissue and a mouse model of EGFR-associated lung cancer, The Narla team discovered that two , KLF6 and FOXO1, function to disrupt overactive EGFR signaling.

After treating the cancerous lung tissue and cancer-prone mice with an FDA-approved drug called trifluoperazine hydrochloride (TFP), which increases the activity of FOXO1, they restored the effectiveness of the anti-EGFR drug erlotinib and reduced tumor growth.

Their work identified new drug targets for EGFR-associated cancers and suggests that combinatorial drug therapy regimens may improve treatment outcome.

More information: Targeting the FOXO1/KLF6 axis regulates EGFR signaling and treatment response, Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2012.

Related Stories

EGFR essential for the development of pancreatic cancer

September 15, 2011

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is essential for KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer development, according to study results presented at the Second AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Basic Cancer Research, ...

Recommended for you

Strange circular DNA may offer new way to detect cancers

July 30, 2015

Strange rings of DNA that exist outside chromosomes are distinct to the cell types that mistakenly produced them, researchers have discovered. The finding raises the tantalizing possibility that the rings could be used as ...

New treatment options for a fatal leukemia

July 27, 2015

In industrialized countries like in Europe, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. An international research consortium lead by pediatric oncologists from the Universities of Zurich and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.