Dual action polyclonal antibody may offer more effective, safer protection against osteoporosis

August 20, 2012

A new study suggests that a polyclonal antibody that blocks follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in mice without ovaries might offer a more effective way to prevent or arrest osteoporosis than currently available treatments.

The study used a mouse model of menopause to show that an injection of a polyclonal antipeptide antibody enhances by simultaneously slowing and building bone, say researchers at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York. In addition, the monoclonal antibody is likely to be safer because it is cleared from the blood and is not retained in bone.

Results from the study are published online August 20 in the journal .

"Bone loss in women begins very early, at least two to three years before a woman's last period and within eight to ten years, a woman will lose 50% of her lifetime bone loss," says the study's senior investigator, Mone Zaidi, MD, Professor of Medicine and of Structural and , at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York." It occurs painlessly, without notice up to a point where women fracture."

Zaidi, who is director, of the Mount Sinai Bone Program, at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, is the senior investigator of the research that developed the polyclonal antipeptide antibody to FSH and tested it in mice whose ovaries were removed. Peptides are short chains of , and the FSH antibody is a highly specific antibody.

"A few years ago, we showed that FSH [follicle stimulating hormone] directly regulates bone by bypassing the estrogen axis," says Zaidi. FSH rises early in menopause, stimulates bone removal and negatively regulates bone formation. "By blocking FSH with the FSH-specific polyclonal antibody, we were able to block by osteoclasts [cells that break down bone] and stimulate bone formation through osteoblasts cells [cells that build bone]."

Zaidi summed up the research team's goal: "Our aim is to find a way to prevent osteoporosis rather than simply treat established disease using medicines that are well tolerated. We believe that a future humanized monoclonal antibody to FSH is likely to be safer than existing treatments because it will not reside in the bone."

Explore further: 'Best of both worlds' -- Targeting a single gene could inhibit bone decay and stimulate bone growth

Related Stories

New hormone data can predict menopause within a year

October 27, 2008

For many women, including the growing number who choose later-in-life pregnancy, predicting their biological clock's relation to the timing of their menopause and infertility is critically important.

Exercise can forestall osteoporosis

April 26, 2010

The stage for osteoporosis is set well before menopause—but exercise can help rewrite the script, according to Medical College of Georgia researchers.

Pituitary hormone TSH found to directly influence bone growth

September 13, 2011

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone produced in the anterior pituitary gland that regulates endocrine function in the thyroid gland, can promote bone ...

Recommended for you

Basic research fuels advanced discovery

August 26, 2016

Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of mankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says ...

New method creates endless supply of kidney precursor cells

August 25, 2016

Salk Institute scientists have discovered the holy grail of endless youthfulness—at least when it comes to one type of human kidney precursor cell. Previous attempts to maintain cultures of the so-called nephron progenitor ...

New avenue for understanding cause of common diseases

August 25, 2016

A ground-breaking Auckland study could lead to discoveries about many common diseases such as diabetes, cancer and dementia. The new finding could also illuminate the broader role of the enigmatic mitochondria in human development.

Strict diet combats rare progeria aging disorders

August 25, 2016

Mice with a severe aging disease live three times longer if they eat thirty percent less. Moreover, they age much healthier than mice that eat as much as they want. These are findings of a joint study being published today ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.