Bolus epidural fentanyl cuts post-spinal decompression pain

Bolus epidural fentanyl cuts post-spinal decompression pain
Intraoperative bolus epidural fentanyl is effective at alleviating early postoperative pain after lumbar canal decompression, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay)—Intraoperative bolus epidural fentanyl is effective at alleviating early postoperative pain after lumbar canal decompression, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in The Spine Journal.

To assess the analgesic efficacy of bolus epidural fentanyl, Mathew R. Guilfoyle, M.B.B.Ch., from Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., and colleagues randomly assigned blinded patients to receive 100-µg bolus epidural fentanyl administered intraoperatively (29 patients) or not (31 controls) after lumbar canal decompression (one to three levels) for degenerative canal stenosis. Pain was assessed through patient-reported Visual Analogue Score (VAS) preoperatively, in recovery, and, if the patient remained in hospital, on the first and second postoperative days.

The researchers found that demographics, duration of surgery, and preoperative VAS were not significantly different between the groups. In patients treated with fentanyl, VAS in recovery was significantly lower (mean 2.6 versus 4.7; P = 0.003), but later VAS and postoperative length of stay were comparable between the groups. Other than the increased number of patients in the fentanyl group requiring temporary urinary catheterization, there was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects.

"Bolus epidural provides effective short-term postoperative analgesia after lumbar canal decompression and may be a useful adjunct to pain management in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed to .

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Oxiplex improves outcomes after lumbar discectomy

Apr 24, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The use of Oxiplex gel (containing carboxymethylcellulose, polyethylene oxide, and calcium) to coat the surgical site during discectomy procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation ...

Recommended for you

Minimally invasive disc surgery is a pain in the neck

Nov 26, 2014

McMaster University researchers have found that current evidence does not support the routine use of minimally invasive surgery to remove herniated disc material pressing on the nerve root or spinal cord in the neck or lower ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.