BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT

October 4, 2012
BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT
In survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, body mass index decreases significantly, mainly due to a reduction in lean, not fat, body mass, according to research published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—In survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), body mass index (BMI) decreases significantly, mainly due to a reduction in lean, not fat, body mass, according to research published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Hiroto Inaba, M.D., Ph.D., of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a involving 179 survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who had received alloHSCT. The authors sought to evaluate changes in body mass and over time.

After a median of 6.6 years of follow-up, the researchers found that BMI z scores declined significantly over time. Mean z scores for lean mass remained below normal levels and decreased significantly over time, while the mean z scores for fat mass were within population norms. Post-HSCT BMI and fat and lean mass z scores were strongly predicted by pre-HSCT BMI category and/or z score. Low BMI and low lean body mass were more frequently found in survivors who had battled extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Older age at HSCT and receipt of T-cell-depleted grafts significantly predicted lower post-HSCT BMI. Compared with males, female patients had higher body fat and lower lean mass z scores, and black patients had higher fat mass z scores compared with white patients.

"In conclusion, we found a significant decline in BMI z scores after alloHSCT in survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies, primarily owing to a decrease in lean mass," the authors write. "We suggest that dietary education and exercise counseling are essential to improve the physical status and overall health of survivors with the risk factors identified in this study."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New treatment options for a fatal leukemia

July 27, 2015

In industrialized countries like in Europe, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. An international research consortium lead by pediatric oncologists from the Universities of Zurich and ...

Exciting results from cancer immunoagent study

July 20, 2015

(Medical Xpress)—Cancer therapies have improved incrementally over the years, but cancer treatment largely remains analogous to forest fire suppression, in which the spread of fire is contained with deliberate controlled ...

Lymphomas tied to metabolic disruption

July 17, 2015

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.