Synribo approved to treat rare leukemia

(HealthDay)—Synribo (omacetaxine mepesuccinate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare blood and bone marrow disease called chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).

Some 5,430 people will be diagnosed with CML this year, the U.S. National Institutes of Health estimates. Synribo has been sanctioned to treat cases in which two other specific anti-cancer drugs have failed to stop CML's progression, the FDA said Friday in a news release.

Synribo is designed to be injected twice daily in different regimens for a number of consecutive days until white blood cell counts normalize, the agency said.

The most common adverse reactions observed during clinical testing included anemia, a drop in infection-fighting , nausea, weakness, fatigue and injection-site reaction.

Synribo is marketed by the Israeli drug maker Teva Pharmaceuticals, with U.S. headquarters in Frazer, Pa.

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about CML.

Related Stories

Marqibo approved for rare leukemia

date Aug 10, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with a rare form of blood and bone marrow cancer, Philadelphia chromosome negative ...

New drug approved for lack of certain white blood cells

date Aug 30, 2012

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug tbo-filgrastim to treat certain cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who have a condition called severe neutropenia, the FDA said in a news release.

Kyprolis approved for multiple myeloma

date Jul 20, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Kyprolis (carfilzomib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat certain people with multiple myeloma who have already been given at least two prior therapies.

Marqibo approved for ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia

date Aug 10, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia ...

Recommended for you

Drug boosts long-term survival after breast cancer

date 4 hours ago

After a diagnosis of localized breast cancer, women are often prescribed tamoxifen for five years to help prevent a recurrence, but researchers said Saturday another drug, anastrazole, may work better.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.