Cancer agency OK'd faulty $11M grant

by Paul J. Weber

(AP)—Texas' embattled $3 billion cancer-fighting agency approved an $11 million grant to a biomedical company even though the proposal wasn't reviewed.

A person with knowledge of the discovery tells The Associated Press the improper funding was uncovered during an internal audit of the and Research Institute of Texas.

The grant in 2010 to Dallas-based Peloton Therapeutics Inc. was among the agency's first.

The person told AP Peloton's funding has been halted and its application is being reviewed. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the agency hasn't announced the audit's findings.

The agency is home to the second largest of cancer-research dollars. It came under scrutiny after several scientists, including Nobel laureates, resigned claiming it was charting a new politically-driven path putting commercial interests before .

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