Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy

Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy
Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

(HealthDay)—Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

Mark D. Peterson, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues describe the impact of early muscle wasting, obesity, and on premature declines in function among adults with cerebral palsy, noting that premature decline is usually attributed to weakness, spasticity, orthopedic abnormalities, chronic pain, and fatigue.

The researchers note that the extent of atrophy and weakness in adults with cerebral palsy is likely influenced by the degree of , which greatly increases their risk of cardiometabolic disease, early mortality, premature , and functional deterioration. The decline in strength is strongly associated with declines in functional capacity, and further declines can be avoided by early detection and physical activity. The authors suggest that reducing sedentary behavior is the best first line of defense against many of the secondary comorbidities.

"In conjunction with the standard physical and occupational therapies prescribed for managing gait/mobility deficits, spasticity and range-of-motion in this population, participation in physical activity and progressive exercise is absolutely vital to prevent secondary muscle pathology and cardiometabolic comorbidity throughout adulthood," Peterson and colleagues conclude.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New research says muscles buckle when relaxed

Nov 01, 2011

Multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and other conditions involving muscle spasticity be better understood following the discovery by Australian researchers that muscle fibres buckle when at rest.

Preterm birth: Magnesium sulphate cuts cerebral palsy risk

Jan 21, 2009

Magnesium sulphate protects very premature babies from cerebral palsy, a new study shows. The findings of this Cochrane Review could help reduce incidence of the disabling condition, which currently affects around one in ...

Recommended for you

Targeting the brain to treat obesity

18 hours ago

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. In the paper, researchers ...

Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'

Jul 21, 2014

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily ...

User comments