Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy

November 2, 2012
Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy
Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

(HealthDay)—Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

Mark D. Peterson, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues describe the impact of early muscle wasting, obesity, and on premature declines in function among adults with cerebral palsy, noting that premature decline is usually attributed to weakness, spasticity, orthopedic abnormalities, chronic pain, and fatigue.

The researchers note that the extent of atrophy and weakness in adults with cerebral palsy is likely influenced by the degree of , which greatly increases their risk of cardiometabolic disease, early mortality, premature , and functional deterioration. The decline in strength is strongly associated with declines in functional capacity, and further declines can be avoided by early detection and physical activity. The authors suggest that reducing sedentary behavior is the best first line of defense against many of the secondary comorbidities.

"In conjunction with the standard physical and occupational therapies prescribed for managing gait/mobility deficits, spasticity and range-of-motion in this population, participation in physical activity and progressive exercise is absolutely vital to prevent secondary muscle pathology and cardiometabolic comorbidity throughout adulthood," Peterson and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: New research says muscles buckle when relaxed

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

New research says muscles buckle when relaxed

November 1, 2011

Multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and other conditions involving muscle spasticity be better understood following the discovery by Australian researchers that muscle fibres buckle when at rest.

Diabetes risk for elderly couch potatoes in Australia

July 24, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Australians aged 60 and over spend more time watching TV than other adults and are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study from The University of Queensland has found.

Recommended for you

Yo-yo dieting might cause extra weight gain

December 5, 2016

Repeated dieting may lead to weight gain because the brain interprets the diets as short famines and urges the person to store more fat for future shortages, new research by the universities of Exeter and Bristol suggests.

New target receptor discovered in the fight against obesity

November 25, 2016

The team of scientists from King's College London and Imperial College London tested a high-fat diet, containing a fermentable carbohydrate, and a control diet on mice and looked at the effect on food intake of those with ...

Does where you live affect what you weigh?

November 21, 2016

Adult obesity rates in the United States have reached epidemic proportions, with one in four people considered obese. Yet, obesity rates vary considerably across states and counties.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.