Fans of reality beauty shows twice as likely to tan, study says

Fans of reality beauty shows twice as likely to tan: study
Practice could make them more susceptible to skin cancer, researchers say.

(HealthDay)—People who tune in to reality beauty shows on television are much more likely to use tanning lamps and to tan outdoors than those who don't watch such shows, a new study finds.

Indoor and outdoor tanning increase the risk of skin cancer, experts note.

The study included 576 college students who were asked about their and tanning habits. Those who watched reality beauty shows were much more likely to use tanning lamps (nearly 13 percent vs. 4 percent) and to tan outdoors (about 43 percent vs. 29 percent) than those who didn't watch such shows.

After taking into account a number of other factors, the Brooklyn College researchers concluded that who watch reality television beauty shows were more than twice as likely to use tanning lamps or to tan outdoors.

The researchers also found that women were about 10 times more likely than men to use tanning lamps.

The findings appear in the .

"This is the first study to report that watching reality television beauty shows is associated with increased tanning lamp use and tanning outdoors. Those who engage in these tanning behaviors place themselves at risk for cancer," author Joshua Fogel, a professor in the finance and business management department, said in a college news release.

The findings do not prove a cause-and-effect link between watching beauty shows and risk, Fogel said.

More information: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about the risks of tanning.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Clinical trial reduces stress of cancer caregivers

date 9 hours ago

Stem cell transplant is essential in the care of many blood cancers, but leaves patients requiring in-home care for months after. Frequently the role of caregiver falls to family or other committed members ...

Video: Debunking three common food myths

date 9 hours ago

You might have heard that microwaving your food is dangerous. Maybe your health nut friend told you that eating frozen veggies is less healthful than eating fresh ones. Is a glass of red wine really good ...

Tackling child abuse in Africa with research and fun

date 12 hours ago

In one of South Africa's poorest areas, an imaginative new parenting programme is tackling the physical and emotional abuse of children. Oxford University's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Andrew Hamilton, travelled ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.