Increases in mean platelet volume after PCI tied to death

Increases in mean platelet volume after PCI tied to death
For patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention, mortality is associated with increases in mean platelet volume over time following the procedure, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—For patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), mortality is associated with increases in mean platelet volume (MPV) over time following the procedure, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

To examine the correlation between MPV and long-term mortality, Binita Shah, M.D., from the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues evaluated MPV at baseline, 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, one year, two years, and three years after PCI in 1,512 patients. The slope of linear regression was used to estimate the speed of change in the MPV. The Social Security Death Index was used to determine mortality.

During a median follow-up of 8.7 years, the researchers found that mortality was 49.3 percent after PCI. There was no significant difference in mortality based on stratification by MPV quartile (first quartile, 50.1 percent; second quartile, 47.7 percent; third quartile, 51.3 percent; fourth quartile, 48.3 percent). Mortality was significantly greater in patients with an increase in the MPV over time after PCI (52.9 percent) than in those with a decrease (44.2 percent) or no change (49.1 percent) in the MPV.

"In conclusion, no association was found between the baseline MPV and long-term mortality in patients undergoing PCI," the authors write. "However, increased mortality was found when the MPV increased over time after PCI. Monitoring the MPV after might play a role in ."

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