Surgeon volume, prognosis post-esophageal cancer op linked

Surgeon volume, prognosis post-esophageal cancer op linked
For patients with esophageal cancer undergoing resection, surgeon volume, but not hospital volume, is independently associated with prognosis, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—For patients with esophageal cancer undergoing resection, surgeon volume, but not hospital volume, is independently associated with prognosis, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

To examine the influence of hospital and surgeon volume on survival after esophageal , Maryam Derogar, M.D., of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, and colleagues conducted a population-based cohort study involving 1,335 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophageal resection in 1987 to 2005. Participants were followed for survival until February 2011.

The researchers found that annual hospital volume was not independently associated with overall survival, and after adjustment for hospital clustering effects, hospital volume was not associated with short-term . Mortality occurring at least three months after surgery was significantly reduced with a combination of higher annual and cumulative surgeon volume, with a hazard ratio of 0.78 for surgeons with both annual and cumulative volume above versus below the median. The association persisted after adjustment for hospital and surgeon clustering.

"In conclusion, this large and population-based cohort study provided evidence that long-term survival is independently influenced by surgeon volume but not hospital volume," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Surgeon experience affects complication rate of spinal stenosis surgery

Jun 07, 2012

For patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis, the risk of complications is higher when the surgeon performs very few such procedures—less than four per year, suggests a study in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeon ...

Hospital volume inconsistent predictor of quality care

May 04, 2009

A new review finds hospital volume to be a useful, albeit imperfect, predictor of short term mortality. While studies, when combined, show a quantifiable and statistically significant inverse association between case volume ...

Recommended for you

Novel oncogenic RET mutation found in small cell lung cancer

40 minutes ago

For the first time an oncogenic somatic mutation at amino acid 918 in the RET (rearranged during transfection) protein has been identified in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors and enforced expression of this mutation within ...

User comments