Albumin improves bacterial peritonitis outcomes

February 7, 2013
Albumin improves bacterial peritonitis outcomes
For patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, albumin infusion is associated with reduced renal impairment and decreased mortality, according to research published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

(HealthDay)—For patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), albumin infusion is associated with reduced renal impairment and decreased mortality, according to research published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Francesco Salerno, M.D., from Università degli Studi di Milano, and colleagues conducted a literature review and meta-analysis that included four involving 288 patients with SBP (three trials comparing albumin with no albumin; one trial comparing albumin with artificial colloid). The effect of albumin infusion on renal impairment and mortality was examined.

Among the studies, the researchers found no evidence of statistically significant heterogeneity or . The incidence of renal impairment was 30.6 percent in the control groups and 8.3 percent in groups given albumin. The likelihood of renal impairment was significantly reduced after albumin infusion (pooled odds ratio, 0.21; range, 0.19 to 0.30 in the individual studies). Mortality was higher among controls compared with patients who received albumin (35.4 versus 16.0 percent). After infusion of albumin, there was a significant decrease in the likelihood of mortality (pooled odds ratio, 0.34; range, 0.16 to 0.55 in the individual studies).

"In this meta-analysis, albumin infusion in patients with SBP decreased renal impairment and mortality," write the authors. "These salutary effects of albumin infusion were remarkably consistent from trial to trial."

Two authors disclosed to CSL Behring, which supported the study.

Explore further: Research opens way to significant improvements for medication

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The 'love hormone' may quiet tinnitus

September 23, 2016

(HealthDay)—People suffering from chronic ringing in the ears—called tinnitus—may find some relief by spraying the hormone oxytocin in their nose, a small initial study by Brazilian researchers suggests.

Bile acid uptake inhibitor prevents NASH / fatty liver in mice

September 21, 2016

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of ...

New therapeutic target for Crohn's disease

September 20, 2016

Research from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) identifies a promising new target for future drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, published today in Cell Reports, also indicates ...

Arthritis drug may help with type of hair loss

September 22, 2016

(HealthDay)—For people who suffer from a condition that causes disfiguring hair loss, a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis might regrow their hair, a new, small study suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.