Primary care extension program should be funded, study says

Study: primary care extension program should be funded
The Primary Care Extension Program has the potential to transform primary care and needs to be funded, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

(HealthDay)—The Primary Care Extension Program (PCEP) has the potential to transform primary care and needs to be funded, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Robert L. Phillips Jr., M.D., from the American Board of Family Medicine in Washington, D.C., and colleagues explain how the PCEP, which was authorized but not funded by the 2010 Act, is critical to enhancing primary care effectiveness, integrating primary care and public health, and translating research into practice.

The researchers draw an analogy between how the Cooperative Extension Program of the U.S. sped the modernization of farming a century ago and how the PCEP could speed the transformation of primary care through local deployment of community-based Health Extension Agents. The authors call for $120 million in annual federal funding for the PCEP, with a target of $500 million for future appropriations, saying the PCEP could speed the transformation of primary care, integrating primary care with public health and translating research into practice. The urgency of these goals requires rapidly building the PCEP, the authors say.

"In conclusion, the rapid pace of change in health care demands that a PCEP be viewed as an essential, and not optional, ingredient for transformation of primary care and improvement of ," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Support players needed to improve primary care delivery

Jan 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—Practice facilitators and care managers can play important roles in improving delivery of primary care, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Me ...

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

33 minutes ago

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

35 minutes ago

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

7 hours ago

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2013
Calling Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard.

Government bureaus are never the answer.