Tapeworm-linked seizures may be rising in US, doctors say

by Randy Dotinga, Healthday Reporter
Tapeworm-linked seizures may be rising in U.S., doctors say
Neurologists issue guidelines for treatment.

(HealthDay)—Tapeworm infection in the brain that can trigger seizures is a growing health concern, doctors say.

But the infection, which leads to swelling in the , is usually treatable with medication, according to a leading association of neurologists.

Estimated cases of neurocysticercosis, as the tapeworm infection is called, range from 40,000 to 160,000 each year in the United States, said Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "It's been around a long time, affecting people living in severe poverty, but the disease is not well-studied or understood," Hotez said.

Texas is one area of the country with many cases. "The disease has now become a leading cause of epilepsy in Houston," Hotez said. "Every [week], we have patients come into our tropical medicine clinic with it."

Concerns about an apparent increase of within the United States led the American Academy of Neurology to issue treatment guidelines for doctors and patients in the April 9 issue of the journal Neurology.

The recommendations are based on a review of 10 studies published between 1980 and 2010 that evaluated so-called cysticidal drugs for treatment of tapeworm infections. The infection involves infestation of the brain with the larvae of the Taenia solium tapeworm. In severe cases, it can cause death.

Tapeworm infection is common in Third World countries because of inadequate sanitation and hygiene, and an estimated 2 million people worldwide have epilepsy as a result. The good news is that good hygiene and food preparation can prevent it.

People develop the tapeworm infection when they consume improperly cooked meat, such as pork, or any food or drink that contains the tapeworm eggs or larvae (also known as cysts). Touching the fecal matter of an infected person is another means of transmission. The larvae then transform into full-sized tapeworms, which can grow to several feet, Hotez said.

In pigs, tapeworm larvae travel to the brain and await transmission to another animal (a human, for instance) when the pigs are eaten, he said. The parasites do the same thing in humans, but there's nowhere to go from the human brain. Ultimately, the larvae die, and that's when the trouble begins.

As the larvae die, they lose the ability to hide from the body's immune system. The immune system responds by causing inflammation, which leads to epileptic seizures and brain swelling, Hotez said.

The guidelines for children and adults recommend using the medication albendazole to kill the cysts if they're alive and treating brain swelling with corticosteroid drugs that dampen the . The study found that albendazole (Albenza), used with or without the corticosteroids, reduced seizure frequency and the number of brain lesions seen in imaging scans. Not enough data was available to evaluate another drug, praziquantel, the researchers said.

Only limited evidence exists to support specific treatment approaches, however, and the treatments may produce side effects, such as abdominal complaints, according to the guidelines. It's also unclear whether anti-epileptic medications may help prevent the seizures caused by the inflammation.

For now, the key is physician awareness, said Dr. Karen Roos, a professor of neurology at the Indiana University School of Medicine and lead author of the guidelines. "Physicians from areas of the world where this infection is endemic are very knowledgeable about this infection," she said. "They know more than U.S. physicians."

with the tapeworm is preventable through proper sanitation, good hygiene and thorough cooking of meat.

More information: For more about tapeworm infection, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Related Stories

Tapeworm brain infection 'serious health concern'

date Apr 14, 2010

Tapeworm infections of the brain, which can cause epileptic seizures, appear to be increasing in Mexico and bordering southwestern states, Loyola University Health System researchers report.

Seizures in patients with pork tapeworm caused by Substance P

date Feb 09, 2012

A neuropeptide called Substance P is the cause of seizures in patients with brains infected by the pork tapeworm (Taenia solium), said Baylor College of Medicine researchers in a report that appears online in the open access ...

Man dies after parasitic worms invade lungs

date Mar 20, 2013

(HealthDay)—A Vietnamese immigrant in California died of a massive infection with parasitic worms that spread throughout his body, including his lungs. They had remained dormant until his immune system ...

Tapeworm DNA contains drug weak spots

date Mar 13, 2013

For the first time, researchers have mapped the genomes of tapeworms to reveal potential drug targets on which existing drugs could act. The genomes provide a new resource that offers faster ways to develop urgently needed ...

Recommended for you

Team makes breakthrough in understanding Canavan disease

date 6 hours ago

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations ...

Finding the body clock's molecular reset button

date 10 hours ago

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep ...

A 'GPS' to navigate the brain's neuronal networks

date 10 hours ago

In new research published today by Nature Methods, scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Harvard University have announced a "Neuronal Positioning System" (NPS) that maps the circuitry of the ...

Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA

date 11 hours ago

Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: They use minor "DNA surgeries" to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, ...

Hate to diet? It's how we are wired

date 11 hours ago

If you're finding it difficult to stick to a weight-loss diet, scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus say you can likely blame hunger-sensitive cells in your brain known ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.