Nonmelanoma skin cancer tied to lower Alzheimer's risk

Nonmelanoma skin cancer tied to lower alzheimer's risk
Older individuals with nonmelanoma skin cancer seem to have a significantly reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online May 15 in Neurology.

(HealthDay)—Older individuals with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) seem to have a significantly reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online May 15 in Neurology.

Robert S. White, from the College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y., and colleagues examined the correlation of NMSC and AD using data from annual assessment for 1,102 community-residing adults (mean age, 79 years at enrollment). Correlations were examined in three nested outcomes groups: only AD (probable or possible AD as the sole diagnosis); any AD (probable AD or possible AD, as well as mixed AD/); and all-cause dementia.

The researchers found that, after adjustment for demographics, hypertension, diabetes, and , prevalent NMSC correlated with a significantly reduced risk of only AD (hazard ratio, 0.21). For 769 individuals, APOE ε4 genotypes were available. When the number of APOE ε4 alleles was included in the model the association was similar in magnitude, but was no longer significant. NMSC was not significantly associated with subsequent development of any AD or all-cause dementia.

"We deduce Alzheimer's-specific , because the effect is attenuated or eliminated when considering less-specific diagnoses such as AD with another diagnosis (any AD) or all-cause dementia," the authors write. "Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the biological and psychosocial basis for the reduced Alzheimer's risk associated with NMSC."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and cognitive technology industries.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Timing of hormone therapy use impacts alzheimer's risk

Oct 25, 2012

(HealthDay)—Use of hormone therapy (HT) within five years of menopause is associated with a reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Neurology.

Recommended for you

Cold sores increase the risk of dementia

14 hours ago

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.

World first effort to prevent dementia in high-risk people

Oct 15, 2014

Dementia will soon engulf more than 100 million people across the globe, but an international research group is leading a world-first effort to prevent dementia in people who are at high risk of this insidious disease.

Aluminium and its likely contribution to Alzheimer's disease

Oct 13, 2014

A world authority on the link between human exposure to aluminium in everyday life and its likely contribution to Alzheimer's disease, Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University, UK, says in a new report that it may ...

User comments