Toward broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for common cold and other infections

Toward broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for common cold and other infections

Scientists are reporting progress in the search for the first broad-spectrum drugs to combat human rhinoviruses (HRVs), which cause humanity's most common infectious diseases. Their study on these potential drugs for infections that include the common cold appears in the journal ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Angus MacLeod and colleagues note that although many HRV infections cause mild disease, they can lead to dangerous complications for millions of people with asthma and . Previous potential drugs for HRV either didn't work or caused unacceptable side effects, leaving only one potential drug still under development in clinical trials. MacLeod's team set out to find new antiviral candidates to meet this serious health challenge.

They describe identifying and successfully testing a group of compounds that work against , Coxsackie virus, poliovirus and enterovirus-71—the cause of hand, . The substances work by blocking the ability of these viruses to multiply.

More information: "Identification of a Series of Compounds with Potent Antiviral Activity for the Treatment of Enterovirus Infections" ACS Med. Chem. Lett., Article ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/ml400095m

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fighting drug-resistant flu viruses

Jul 15, 2009

Amid reports that swine flu viruses are developing the ability to shrug off existing antiviral drugs, scientists in Japan are reporting a first-of-its kind discovery that could foster a new genre of antivirals ...

Recommended for you

Boxed warnings are common in novel therapeutics

Aug 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—Boxed warnings are common on recent drug approvals, and many occur years after approval, according to a research letter published online Aug. 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

AstraZeneca says DOJ closes probe into drug trial

Aug 19, 2014

British drugmaker AstraZeneca says the U.S. Department of Justice has closed its investigation into a clinical trial of the company's blood thinner Brilinta, and plans no further action.

User comments