At-home care cuts depression in older African-Americans

August 20, 2013
At-home care cuts depression in older african-americans
A home-based intervention delivered by social workers reduces symptoms and improves quality of life in older African-Americans with depressive symptoms, according to research published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—A home-based intervention delivered by social workers reduces symptoms and improves quality of life in older African-Americans with depressive symptoms, according to research published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Laura N. Gitlin, Ph.D., of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues randomly assigned 208 African-Americans aged 55 years and older with depressive symptoms to either a multicomponent, home-based care management (106 patients) or a wait-list control group (102 patients).

The researchers found that, among the 89 participants who completed four months of the intervention program (compared with 93 participants in the control group) significant differences were observed in reduced severity of depression, increased knowledge of depression, improved quality of life, greater behavioral activation, reduced anxiety, and improved function. At four months, more participants in the intervention group entered remission (43.8 percent) than those in the control group (26.9 percent).

"African-Americans often have limited options," the authors write. "A home-based intervention delivered by social workers could reduce depressive symptoms and enhance quality of life in some older African-Americans."

Explore further: Modified DASH intervention feasible for African-Americans

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Modified DASH intervention feasible for African-Americans

January 28, 2013

(HealthDay)—For African-Americans in an under-resourced community, use of a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-intervention is feasible, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the U.S. Centers ...

Primary care model ups African Americans' glycemic control

April 5, 2013

(HealthDay)—A primary care strategy targeting rural, low-income, African-American patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with improved glycemic control, according to research published in March/April issue of the ...

Church-based diet, physical activity program effective

June 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—For rural African-Americans, church-based diet and physical interventions may be effective for improving healthy lifestyle choices, according to a study published June 6 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

Study tracks depression in seniors, ethnic groups

July 10, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Major depression is a serious public health problem among older adults in the United States, but tends to affect ethnic groups differently, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

Self-help program ups mental health in rheumatic disease

July 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—A cognitive-behavioral, self-help intervention can improve depression and anxiety in patients with rheumatic conditions, according to a study published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Recommended for you

The birth of politics in children—the case of dominance

September 26, 2016

As they grow up, do children become young Robin Hoods? Depending on their age, they do not allocate resources in the same way between dominant and subordinate individuals. Thus a tendency towards egalitarianism develops and ...

Oxytocin enhances spirituality, new study says

September 21, 2016

Oxytocin has been dubbed the "love hormone" for its role promoting social bonding, altruism and more. Now new research from Duke University suggests the hormone may also support spirituality.

Study reveals a biological link between stress and obesity

September 21, 2016

Metabolic and anxiety-related disorders both pose a significant healthcare burden, and are in the spotlight of contemporary research and therapeutic efforts. Although intuitively we assume that these two phenomena overlap, ...

Men with anxiety are more likely to die of cancer, study says

September 20, 2016

Men over 40 who are plagued with the omnipresent of generalized anxiety disorder are more than twice as likely to die of cancer than are men who do not have the mental affliction, new research finds. But for women who suffer ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.