Diabetes apps among top 10 doctors recommend to patients

August 31, 2013
Diabetes apps among top 10 doctors recommend to patients
Apps for managing diabetes and calculating the risk of cardiovascular disease are among the top 10 apps doctors recommend to their patients, according to researchers at Medical Economics.

(HealthDay)—Apps for managing diabetes and calculating the risk of cardiovascular disease are among the top 10 apps doctors recommend to their patients, according to researchers at Medical Economics.

Many of the apps recommended by doctors are related to diabetes management, including Diabetes, iCookbook Diabetic, Diabetes In Check, and Glucose Companion, all of which allow patients to monitor their condition, track their , access diabetes-friendly recipes and plan meals, and track their blood sugar and weight. The apps also allow patients to create a record of their tracking results to share with their doctor.

Also among the top apps are ones related to cardiovascular health and . The iCalcRisk app encourages patients to adopt healthier lifestyles by calculating their cardiac risk, while the Blood Pressure Monitor and HeartWise Blood Pressure Tracker apps aid patients in monitoring their blood pressure, , and weight. Tummy Trends, for patients with constipation and (IBS), helps patients track their IBS symptoms, exercise habits, water intake, fiber intake, and stress levels and share the results with their physician.

For general health, physicians recommend the iTriage app, which allows patients to access health information to check their symptoms and easily locate a physician or hospital in the event of an emergency. Lastly, Mayo Clinic Health Community offers patients access to an online health community where they can connect with other patients experiencing similar health issues.

Explore further: Health apps abound, but usage low, study shows

More information: More Information

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