USPSTF updates recommendations on youth blood pressure screening

October 7, 2013

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents. Hypertension in children and adolescents has increased over the past several decades, which may be attributable to the climb in childhood overweight and obesity rates.

An estimated 11 percent of obese children in the United States suffer from , putting them at increased risk for hypertension in adulthood.

One rationale for screening young patients is that it could lead to interventions that reduce blood pressure and reduce the risk for cardiovascular events and death in adulthood. However, there might also be harms associated with early treatment. A review of evidence published since the Task Force's 2003 recommendation found insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about the balance of the benefits and harms of screening.

The full recommendation statement is being published in Annals of Internal Medicine and also in Pediatrics.

Explore further: Experts dispute value of checking kids' blood pressure

Related Stories

Experts dispute value of checking kids' blood pressure

February 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—Despite a worrisome increase in obese and hypertensive children and teens, not enough evidence exists to justify routinely screening young people for high blood pressure, a new report says.

USPSTF: evidence lacking for ankle brachial index screening

September 3, 2013

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) for screening for peripheral ...

Recommended for you

Some youth football drills riskier than others

August 23, 2016

Nearly three quarters of the football players in the U.S. are less than 14 years old. But amid growing concern about concussion risk in football, the majority of the head-impact research has focused on college and professional ...

Babies often put to sleep in unsafe positions

August 15, 2016

(HealthDay)—Despite decades of warnings from the "Back to Sleep" campaign, many parents are still putting their babies to sleep in ways that raise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a new study finds.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.