USPSTF updates recommendations on youth blood pressure screening

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents. Hypertension in children and adolescents has increased over the past several decades, which may be attributable to the climb in childhood overweight and obesity rates.

An estimated 11 percent of obese children in the United States suffer from , putting them at increased risk for hypertension in adulthood.

One rationale for screening young patients is that it could lead to interventions that reduce blood pressure and reduce the risk for cardiovascular events and death in adulthood. However, there might also be harms associated with early treatment. A review of evidence published since the Task Force's 2003 recommendation found insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about the balance of the benefits and harms of screening.

The full recommendation statement is being published in Annals of Internal Medicine and also in Pediatrics.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Experts dispute value of checking kids' blood pressure

Feb 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—Despite a worrisome increase in obese and hypertensive children and teens, not enough evidence exists to justify routinely screening young people for high blood pressure, a new report says.

Recommended for you

Neonatal vitamin K refusal tied to nonimmunization

13 hours ago

(HealthDay)—While neonatal vitamin K refusal is rare, parents who refuse vitamin K are less likely to immunize their child, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in Pediatrics.

Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity

15 hours ago

Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less ...

Researchers show economic disparities impact infant health

16 hours ago

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research ...

User comments