Older sedentary adults reduced injury to heart through moderate physical activity

Moderate physical activity in sedentary older adults reduced the progression of injury to the heart, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013.

In a pilot study, 310 adults 70 years and older with a previously sedentary lifestyle, were randomly assigned to one-year supervised or to health education controls.

Troponin T, a blood-based injury marker which historically has been used for the diagnosis of heart attack was measured with a new high sensitive cardiac assay (hs cTnT).

The levels, measured at baseline and at one year, had more than a three times increase in the control population than in the exercise group, researchers said.

"Our findings suggest biochemical evidence to support the old adage, 'You're never too old to start a physical activity program to improve cardiac health,'" said Christopher DeFilippi, M.D., study lead author.

Researchers will further explore the impact of exercise on successful aging in a National Institute of Aging study.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New technologies help people with heart disease

9 minutes ago

People taking part in cardiac rehabilitation exercise programmes are likely to maintain healthy behaviours for longer with text message and web-based support, according to recent research from the University of Auckland.

A novel pathway for prevention of heart attack and stroke

23 hours ago

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which ...

Exercise may protect older women from irregular heartbeat

Aug 20, 2014

Increasing the amount or intensity of physical activity can cut the chances of older women developing a life-threatening irregular heartbeat, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA).

User comments