Crimes against women grossly underestimated, report says

December 14, 2013
Crimes against women grossly underestimated, report says
Researchers look at gender-based violence in 24 countries.

(HealthDay)—Violence committed against women by men is vastly under-reported in many countries, a large new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 93,600 women in 24 countries who survived sexual or , often called gender-based violence. Only 7 percent of the reported the incidents to legal, medical or social support services, and only 37 percent informed family, friends or neighbors.

In 20 of the 24 countries, the majority of women told no one at all, according to the study published online Dec. 12 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that reports of gender-based violence to officials may underestimate the number of actual cases by 11 to 128 times.

"Our results confirm that the vast majority of women who have experienced [gender-based violence] remain uncounted," study leader Tia Palermo, assistant professor in and the department of preventive medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in New York, said in a university news release.

"The research further indicates that not only are most survivors not receiving formal services, but they are not receiving informal support from friends and family members," she added.

Palermo said the findings show the need for the following: "one-stop" centers for survivors of gender-based violence; community- and nation-based programs to reduce the stigma of such violence; and increased local distribution of information on available services to gender-based survivors, particularly in rural areas and to young .

Explore further: Bisexual women at especially high risk of sexual violence, CDC says

More information: The World Health Organization has more about violence against women.

Related Stories

Suicide linked to partner violence for New Zealand women

November 1, 2013

New Zealand women who have experienced partner violence are more likely to contemplate suicide, according to New Zealand findings published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health last week.

Recommended for you

Drunk driving laws don't match the research

July 25, 2016

Emergency physicians learn to be prepared for anything thrown at us in the clinical arena. Personal life is a different story. Last year a drunk driver with multiple prior offenses and no valid driver's license smashed a ...

Clock controls junk food appeal

July 22, 2016

When it comes to extra kilojoules, a little more self-restraint won't go astray as the day progresses. New research from Flinders University and Liverpool University has studied the urge to snack more later in the day, even ...

Diagnoses: When are several opinions better than one?

July 22, 2016

Methods of collective intelligence can result in considerably more accurate medical diagnoses, but only under certain conditions. A study headed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has shed new ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Egleton
not rated yet Dec 15, 2013
I won't let one in the house.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.