Laser-assisted drug delivery is evolving

Laser-assisted drug delivery is evolving

(HealthDay)—Laser-assisted drug delivery can enhance the permeation of topically applied agents, according to a review published in the April issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Lindsay R. Sklar, M.D., from the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, and colleagues conducted a literature review to assess the existing applications of laser-assisted .

The researchers found that lasers are a safe and effective means of enhancing the delivery of topically applied agents through the skin. The most commonly used lasers for drug delivery are the and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers. Laser pretreatment of the skin can increase the permeability and depth of penetration of topically applied drug molecules for both local cutaneous and systemic applications, according to multiple studies.

"Laser-assisted drug delivery is an evolving technology with potentially broad clinical applications," the authors write.

One author disclosed to the laser industry.

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