Incentives may lead to greater support for practice goals

Incentives may lead to greater support for practice goals

(HealthDay)—Incentives may aid employees in meeting practice goals, according to an article published May 23 in Medical Economics.

The author of the article, Judy Bee, a medical practice consultant from the Practice Performance Group in La Jolla, Calif., identifies five tips to set up an incentive plan tied to measurable practice goals.

Bee's recommendations are: (1) establish a bonus pool for increasing the number of new practice patients; (2) offer paid time off; (3) instead of forcing group activities, distribute the cash; (4) make bonus distribution more frequent, possibly monthly or quarterly; and (5) use a plan template that elucidates benchmarks for patient-generated revenue triggers.

"If you want more than just a 'good job' from your employees, an incentive plan may help," Bee writes.

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physicians should motivate and retain top employees

Oct 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—Even in a time of declining reimbursements, smart employers should know how to motivate and retain superstar employees in their practice, according to an article published Oct. 10 in Medical Ec ...

Recommended for you

Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?

2 hours ago

Hoping for sex with two women is common but fantasizing about golden showers is not. That's just one of the findings from a research project that scientifically defines sexual deviation for the first time ever. It was undertaken ...

AMA 'Code of Ethics' offers guidance for physicians

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) Code of Ethics and other articles provide guidance for physicians in relation to public health emergencies, according to a report from the AMA.

Pot-infused edibles: One toke over the line in Colorado?

12 hours ago

Marijuana shops have sprouted across Denver ever since Colorado legalized the drug for adults in January, but the popularity of pot-infused edibles has surprised authorities, and parents are seeking a ban ahead of Halloween.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.