RNA aptamers targeted to plasminogen activator inhibitor

© Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Plasminogen activators are proteins involved in the breakdown of blood clots, and an elevated level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is associated with an increased risk for clotting and cardiovascular disease. No PAI-1 inhibitors are currently available for clinical use, but a novel therapeutic approach using a targeted RNA aptamer drug that has been shown to block PAI-1 activity and prevent PAI-1-associated vascular events is described in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics.

Jared Damare, Stephanie Brandal, and Yolanda Fortenberry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, designed a library of small RNA molecules that target different regions of PAI-1. They then screened the library and enriched for the aptamers that were the most selective for binding to and inhibiting the function of PAI-1. The authors demonstrate the ability of these RNA aptamers to prevent PAI-1 from interacting with plasminogen activators in the article "Inhibition of PAI-1 Antiproteolytic Activity Against tPA by RNA Aptamers."

"Even beyond the admirable care and rigor of the work, the therapeutic significance lies in the authors addressing a vital concern: the identification of an aptamer that can specifically disrupt the target function of PAI-1 without inhibiting its other functions," says Executive Editor Graham C. Parker, PhD, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI.

Nucleic Acid Therapeutics is under the editorial leadership of Co-Editors-in-Chief Bruce A. Sullenger, PhD, Duke Translational Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, and C.A. Stein, MD, PhD, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA; and Executive Editor Graham C. Parker, PhD.

Related Stories

Experimental drug prolongs life span in mice

date May 01, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Northwestern Medicine scientists have newly identified a protein's key role in cell and physiological aging and have developed – in collaboration with Tohoku University in Japan—an experimental ...

Recommended for you

Protein may improve liver regeneration

date 1 hour ago

Researchers at UC Davis have illuminated an important distinction between mice and humans: how human livers heal. The difference centers on a protein called PPARα, which activates liver regeneration. Normally, mouse PPARα ...

Female embryos less likely to survive to birth

date 9 hours ago

New research has challenged the prevailing belief that the higher proportion of male babies born in the general population results from a higher proportion of males being conceived. 

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.