FDA approves Boehringer's once-a-day inhaler drug

(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new long-acting inhaler drug from Boehringer Ingelheim to treat people with chronic lung disease.

The agency approved Striverdi Respimat for chronic , which causes bronchitis and emphysema and affects about 24 million people in the U.S. The disease, which is most often caused by smoking, is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the National Institutes of Health.

The FDA approved the drug on Thursday based on a study in 3,104 patients which showed improvements in lung function versus placebo.

The drug will carry a bold warning that it is not approved to treat patients with asthma. Striverdi Respimate is part of a family of medications that have been linked to asthma-related deaths.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tudorza pressair approved for COPD

Jul 24, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The Tudorza Pressair (aclidinium bromide) inhaler has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat narrowing of the lung airways associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ...

Anoro ellipta approved for COPD

Dec 18, 2013

(HealthDay)—A new inhaled drug to treat a serious lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Adempas approved to treat pulmonary hypertension

Oct 09, 2013

(HealthDay)—Adempas (riociguat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat two types of pulmonary hypertension, characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs.

Recommended for you

Experts want restrictions on testosterone drug use (Update)

18 hours ago

Federal health experts said Wednesday there is little evidence that testosterone-boosting drugs are effective for treating common signs of aging in men and that their use should be narrowed to exclude millions of Americans ...

Big cities take aim at prescription painkillers

Sep 16, 2014

Some of the nation's largest cities are ratcheting up their criticism of prescription painkillers, blaming the industry for a wave of addiction and overdoses that have ravaged their communities and busted local budgets.

World Health Organization policy improves use of medicines

Sep 16, 2014

In this issue of PLOS Medicine, Kathleen Holloway from WHO and David Henry (University of Toronto, Canada) evaluated data on reported adherence to WHO essential medicines practices and measures of quality use of medicines from 5 ...

User comments