FDA approves Boehringer's once-a-day inhaler drug

(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new long-acting inhaler drug from Boehringer Ingelheim to treat people with chronic lung disease.

The agency approved Striverdi Respimat for chronic , which causes bronchitis and emphysema and affects about 24 million people in the U.S. The disease, which is most often caused by smoking, is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the National Institutes of Health.

The FDA approved the drug on Thursday based on a study in 3,104 patients which showed improvements in lung function versus placebo.

The drug will carry a bold warning that it is not approved to treat patients with asthma. Striverdi Respimate is part of a family of medications that have been linked to asthma-related deaths.

Related Stories

Tudorza pressair approved for COPD

date Jul 24, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The Tudorza Pressair (aclidinium bromide) inhaler has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat narrowing of the lung airways associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ...

Anoro ellipta approved for COPD

date Dec 18, 2013

(HealthDay)—A new inhaled drug to treat a serious lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Adempas approved to treat pulmonary hypertension

date Oct 09, 2013

(HealthDay)—Adempas (riociguat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat two types of pulmonary hypertension, characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs.

Recommended for you

Mylan rebuffs Teva again; calls bid low, insincere

date 3 hours ago

Generic drug company Mylan rejected for the second time Monday a $40.1 billion takeover offer from Israeli pharmaceutical power Teva, just days after Mylan's own bid for rival Perrigo was rebuffed.

Rising antibiotic shortages raise concerns about patient care

date Apr 23, 2015

Shortages of key antibiotics, including gold-standard therapies and drugs used to treat highly resistant infections, are on the rise, according to a new study of shortages from 2001 to 2013 published in Clinical Infectious Di ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.