Mechanism of maternal age effect on oocytes is questioned

Mechanism of maternal age effect on oocytes is questioned
New research suggests that the "production-line model" is not the basis for the maternal-age effect on trisomy, according to research published in the July 3 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

(HealthDay)—New research suggests that the "production-line model" is not the basis for the maternal-age effect on trisomy, according to research published in the July 3 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Ross Rowsey, of Washington State University in Pullman, and colleagues conducted molecular cytogenetic studies using 191 samples of second-trimester human fetal ovaries to examine the number and distribution of crossover-associated proteins in more than 8,000 prophase-stage oocytes. The researchers looked for evidence supporting or refuting a key component of the "production-line model," stating that the first oocytes to enter have more recombination events (crossovers) than those that enter meiosis later in fetal life.

The researchers found that, although recombination levels varied among fetal samples, there was no evidence that they differ for oocytes entering meiosis early in fetal life compared with those that enter meiosis late in fetal life.

"Thus, our data provide a direct test of the second tenet of the production-line model and suggest that it does not provide a plausible explanation for the human maternal-age effect, meaning that—45 years after its introduction—we can finally conclude that the production-line model is not the basis for the maternal-age effect on trisomy," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Do ovaries continue to produce eggs during adulthood?

Jul 26, 2012

A compelling new genetic study tracing the origins of immature egg cells, or 'oocytes', from the embryonic period throughout adulthood adds new information to a growing controversy. The notion of a "biological clock" in women ...

Recommended for you

Scientists discover gene controlling muscle fate

53 seconds ago

Scientists at the University of New Mexico have moved a step closer to improving medical science through research involving muscle manipulation of fruit flies. They discovered in the flight muscles of Drosophila ...

Study clues to aging bone loss

6 minutes ago

In Canada, bone fractures due to osteoporosis affect one in three women and one in five men over their lifetimes, costing the health care system more than $2.3 billion a year.

Sweat-eating bacteria may improve skin health

14 hours ago

Bacteria that metabolize ammonia, a major component of sweat, may improve skin health and some day could be used for the treatment of skin disorders, such as acne or chronic wounds. In a study conducted by AOBiome LLC, human ...

User comments