Antidepressants vary in their contribution to weight gain

August 11, 2014
Antidepressants vary in their contribution to weight gain

(HealthDay)—Antidepressants vary modestly in the likelihood of contributing to weight gain, according to a study published in the August issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

Sarah R. Blumenthal, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues identified 22,610 of a large New England health care system who began receiving an index antidepressant prescription and had available weight data in .

In models adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical features, the researchers observed a significantly decreased rate of weight gain in individuals treated with bupropion (P = 0.02), amitriptyline (P = 0.001), and nortriptyline (P < 0.001), compared with citalopram. Among individuals discontinuing treatment prior to 12 months, differences were smaller.

"Antidepressants differ modestly in their propensity to contribute to ," the authors write. "Short-term investigations may be insufficient to characterize and differentiate this risk."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Perceived weight gain accurate for new contraceptive users

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Perceived weight gain accurate for new contraceptive users

January 22, 2013

(HealthDay)—For new contraceptive users, perceived weight gain, reported by about one-third of users, often represents actual weight gain, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics ...

Inadequate weight gain in overweight moms tied to SGA

August 5, 2014

(HealthDay)—For overweight and obese women, inadequate weight gain is associated with increased risk of small for gestational age (SGA), according to a study published in the August issue of the America Journal of Obstetrics ...

Recommended for you

Language juggling rewires bilingual brain

February 13, 2016

Bilinguals use and learn language in ways that change their minds and brains, which has consequences—many positive, according to Judith F. Kroll, a Penn State cognitive scientist.

'Grit' adds little to prediction of academic achievement

February 11, 2016

Personality characteristics - especially conscientiousness - have previously been shown to have a significant but moderate influence on academic achievement. However, a new study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology ...

Why smiles (and frowns) are contagious

February 11, 2016

Smile! It makes everyone in the room feel better because they, consciously or unconsciously, are smiling with you. Growing evidence shows that an instinct for facial mimicry allows us to empathize with and even experience ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.