News tagged with appetite

Related topics: food intake , food , obesity

Seven ways to feel full without overeating

Not feeling full after or between meals can result in overeating. In the October issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), contributing editor Linda Milo Ohr ...

Oct 22, 2014
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Lose fat faster before breakfast

People can burn up to 20% more body fat by exercising in the morning on an empty stomach, according to new research from Northumbria University.

Jan 24, 2013
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Mind over matter: You are what you think you eat

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new study by Yale University suggests that people's state of mind may influence how physically satisfied they feel after a meal and how likely they are to still feel hungry and consume additional ...

May 25, 2011
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A weak heart produces a poor appetite

Heart-brain-stomach link of major importance for diabetes and heart failure discovered: as a recent study by the MedUni Vienna has demonstrated, the hormone BNP, generated by the heart, also has an appetite-inhibiting ...

Jul 12, 2012
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Fatty food cravings genetically programmed

(Medical Xpress) -- In a new study published in Neuropsychopharmacology, Dr. Alasdair MacKenzie has found a genetic switch that regulates thirst and appetite and is believed to be the reason many people from Western countr ...

Jul 18, 2011
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Lift weights, eat mustard, build muscles?

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that rats fed homobrassinolide, found in the mustard plant, produced an anabolic effect, and increased appetite and muscle mass, as well as the number and size of muscle fibers.

Sep 29, 2011
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Appetite

The appetite is the desire to eat food, felt as hunger. Appetite exists in all higher life-forms, and serves to regulate adequate energy intake to maintain metabolic needs. It is regulated by a close interplay between the digestive tract, adipose tissue and the brain. Decreased desire to eat is termed anorexia, while polyphagia (or "hyperphagia") is increased eating. Dysregulation of appetite contributes to anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, cachexia, overeating, and binge eating disorder.

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