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Biomedical technology news

Ophthalmology

Improved retinal transplant technique ready for clinical trials

Researchers led by Michiko Mandai at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have used a genetic modification to improve human-derived retina transplants grown in the lab. After transplant into damaged ...

Addiction

Can wearable technology predict the negative consequences of drinking?

"How much have you had to drink?" might seem like a simple question, but it is not always easy to answer. Although there are general guidelines about responsible alcohol consumption, a person's level of intoxication depends ...

Attention deficit disorders

Virtual reality game can assess children's ADHD symptoms

A new virtual reality game helps detect symptoms related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, which has been challenging with the existing tools. With further work, the game could also help treat ...

Biomedical technology

Scientists develop COVID-19 testing lab in a backpack

In a new study, published in PLOS ONE, scientists from Queen Mary University of London show that their lab-in-a-backpack approach is as effective as commercially available COVID-19 tests at detecting SARS-CoV-2.

Neuroscience

Constant tinnitus is linked to altered brain activity

There has to date been no reliable objective method of diagnosing tinnitus. Researchers from Karolinska Institutet now show that brainstem audiometry can be used to measure changes in the brain in people with constant tinnitus. ...

Ophthalmology

High-tech eye drop research targets corneal damage

New research has laid the groundwork for a long-lasting eye drop to treat corneal neovascularisation (CoNV), a condition which affects more than a million people globally each year.

Health

New condom could boost use, study finds

A condom designed to increase sexual pleasure has the potential to increase protected sex and decrease sexually transmitted infections, a new study suggests.

Pediatrics

Correctly classifying coughs with machine learning

Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have shown that deep learning models can accurately distinguish between healthy and sick children using only their cough sounds. These findings, published ...

Vaccination

Emerging protein-based COVID-19 vaccines could be game-changing

Current messenger RNA vaccines appear to offer at least some protection against new SARS-CoV-2 variants, including omicron, especially for people who have received boosters. But manufacturing costs and the need for ultra-cold ...

Cardiology

Imaging collagen: A new technique for therapeutics?

Myocardial infarction, or a heart attack, affects over 800,000 people in the U.S. every year. Following a heart attack, a scar forms on the heart, leading to poorer heart function, and ultimately, it could lead to heart failure. ...

Medications

Antifreeze cream prevents frostbite injuries to skin

Skiers, hikers, soldiers and others exposed to extreme cold temperatures can experience frostbite—a painful injury that occurs when ice crystals form in the skin. Many extremely cold areas are also remote, and delays in ...

Health informatics

AI to help doctors treat deafness

One out of five patients with hearing loss, severe hearing impairment or who were born deaf, have deformations in the inner ear, and could benefit from having an advanced hearing aid known as a cochlear implant (CI) implanted. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Disinfecting PPE for reuse, recycling

A professor at Waterloo Engineering collaborated with researchers in New Zealand on the development of a method to disinfect personal protective equipment (PPE) for reuse or recycling.

Biomedical technology

Intensive care patients speak with their eyes

Intubated, ventilated, unable to speak: due to their condition, many critically ill patients are unable to express themselves. They can only communicate their wishes and needs, descriptions of symptoms, or pain sensations ...

Biomedical technology

The free-energy principle explains the brain

The RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan, along with colleagues, has shown that the free-energy principle can explain how neural networks are optimized for efficiency. Published in the scientific journal Communications ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

What's a pulse oximeter? Should I buy one to monitor COVID at home?

Having a low level of oxygen in the blood is an early sign of worsening COVID. But not everyone gets obvious symptoms. For instance, some people can have low oxygen levels without getting short of breath or feeling otherwise ...

Medical research

Regrowing knee cartilage with an electric kick

UConn bioengineers successfully regrew cartilage in a rabbit's knee, a promising hop toward healing joints in humans, they report in the 12 January issue of Science Translational Medicine.