Skin Cancer

Tanning's allure tied to other addictions

(HealthDay)—People who seem to have a deep tan year-round—whether from the sun or indoor tanning—may be "addicted" to tanning. And new research suggests there's also a link between such tanning and other addictions.

Mar 31, 2017
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Breast milk as a weapon against cancer

In an FWF-funded project, scientists at the University of Graz modified and reinforced a host defence peptide from breast milk so as to enable it to specifically detect cancer cells. The active substance can then induce cell ...

Apr 10, 2017
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Immunity against melanoma is only skin deep

In a newly published study, researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center find that unique immune cells, called resident memory T cells, do an outstanding job of preventing melanoma. The work began with the question ...

Apr 14, 2017
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Deploying an ancient defense to kill cancer

A recent small trial in 15 cancer patients with advanced soft-tissue sarcomas aimed to find out whether an experimental drug based on a certain bacterial molecule could trigger an immune response to fight cancer.

Apr 03, 2017
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Surgery may be best for advanced melanoma

(HealthDay)—Surgery to remove melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—can extend the lives of patients whose disease has spread to the abdomen area, new research suggests.

Apr 05, 2017
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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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