Child Development

As the flagship journal of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), Child Development has published articles, essays, reviews, and tutorials on various topics in the field of child development since 1930. Spanning many disciplines, the journal provides the latest research, not only for researchers and theoreticians, but also for child psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, psychiatric social workers, specialists in early childhood education, educational psychologists, special education teachers, and other researchers. In addition to six issues per year of Child Development, subscribers to the journal also receive a full subscription to Child Development Perspectives and Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-CDEV.html
Impact factor
4.195 (2016)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychological research has a racism problem, scholar says

Race plays a critical role in shaping how people experience the world around them, so one would expect a rich body of literature published in mainstream psychological journals to examine its effects on people's thoughts, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Chatty kids do better at school

Young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced, a new study suggests.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Are we teaching kids to write all wrong?

"As you can see, individual differences in writing can be seen as early as kindergarten," says Cynthia Puranik, associate professor in the College of Education & Human Development. On her computer, she pulls up writing samples ...

Health

How sleep helps teens deal with social stress

A new Michigan State University study found that a good night's sleep does adolescents good—beyond helping them stay awake in class. Adequate sleep can help teens navigate challenging social situations.

Neuroscience

Do some children really hear 30 million more words than others?

The concept that children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds start out at a learning disadvantage because they hear fewer words than children from higher socioeconomic backgrounds—a so-called 30 million-word gap—should ...

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