Journal of the American Medical Association

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, medical journal, published by the American Medical Association. Beginning in July 2011, the editor in chief will be Howard C. Bauchner, vice chairman of pediatrics at Boston University’s School of Medicine, replacing Catherine D. DeAngelis, who has served since 2000. In 1883, the first editor was Nathan Smith Davis (1817–1904). From 1883–1960, this journal was listed with ISSN 0002-9955 and without the acronym JAMA. Furthermore, there are French and Spanish language editions of JAMA. Established in 1883 by the American Medical Association and published continuously since then, JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and ancillary content (such as abstracts of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report). The journal covers a variety of medical topics. It includes fundamental research, research for the clinical sciences, and informs physicians of developments in other fields. Issues pertaining to medicine and health care are debated in this journal. Broader topical coverage related to medicine, includes nonclinical aspects of medicine,

Publisher
American Medical Association
Country
United States
History
1883–present
Impact factor
28.899 (2009)

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Neuroscience

Stem cell transplant reverses disabling MS-like disease

A stem cell transplant reversed a debilitating neurological disease that causes half of the patients to go blind and lose the ability to walk five years after diagnosis. Most of the patients stayed better five years after ...

Health

Alcohol intake linked to dementia risk

Researchers in the US have revealed that alcohol intake in later life is linked with dementia risk. The findings are published today (Friday 27 September) in the journal JAMA.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Surgery may benefit women with two types of urinary incontinence

Surgery for stress urinary incontinence (leaking that occurs with a cough or sneeze) improves symptoms of another form of incontinence, called urgency urinary incontinence, in women who have both types, according to a study ...

Surgery

Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects

Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy. That's according ...

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