mBio

mBio is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). ASM has been publishing microbiology research since 1916, and mBio represents ASM’s first cross-discipline, open-access publication. The scope of mBio includes all aspects of the microbiological sciences, including virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and allied fields, which may include immunology, ecology, geology, population biology, computational biology, anti-infectives and vaccines, public health, etc. mBio complements ASM’s 9 primary research journals, which serve more specific disciplines. The ASM journals program has historically provided a venue for the publication of a wide spectrum of microbiological research. ASM publishes 11 other journals that focus on narrower areas of microbiology such as bacteriology and virology. mBio was conceived (i) to offer a publication vehicle for more cutting-edge research of broader interest and (ii) to serve as a laboratory to test new publishing technologies.

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Website
http://mbio.asm.org/

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Immunology

Study shows CRISPR effectiveness against colitis pathogen

Research at North Carolina State University shows that the CRISPR-Cas system can be used to effectively target and eliminate specific gut bacteria, in this case Clostridioides difficile, the pathogen that causes colitis—a ...

Medical research

Obesity promotes virulence of influenza

Obesity promotes the virulence of the influenza virus, according to a study conducted in mice published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The finding could explain, in part, why the ...

HIV & AIDS

Researchers isolate switch that kills inactive HIV

Using genetic sequencing, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have identified a principal cellular player controlling HIV reproduction in immune cells which, when turned off or deleted, eliminates ...

Genetics

Scientists discover new antibiotic resistance gene

While sifting through the bacterial genome of salmonella, Cornell food scientists discovered mcr-9, a new, stealthy jumping gene so diabolical and robust that it resists one of the world's few last-resort antibiotics.

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