Psychological Bulletin

Psychological Bulletin is a peer-reviewed academic journal specializing in literature reviews. It was founded by Johns Hopkins psychologist James Mark Baldwin in 1904 immediately after he had bought out James McKeen Cattell s share of Psychological Review, which the two had founded ten years earlier. Baldwin gave the editorship of both journals to John B. Watson when scandal forced him to resign his position at Johns Hopkins in 1909. Ownership of the Bulletin passed to Howard C. Warren, who eventually donated it to the American Psychological Association which continues to own it to the present day.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Country
United States
History
1904-present
Website
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/bul/index.aspx
Impact factor
11.975 (2011)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

'I'd rather not know': Why we choose ignorance

When given the choice to learn how their actions will affect someone else, 40% of people will choose ignorance, often in order to have an excuse to act selfishly, according to recent research.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Limited gestures may not be definitive in diagnosing autism

Limited gesturing is often a key part of establishing a diagnosis of autism, but new research indicates that certain types of gestures may not necessarily be produced less frequently than others.

Psychology & Psychiatry

New insights into how the human brain organizes language

A new study has provided the first clear picture of where language processes are located in the brain. The findings may be useful in clinical trials involving language recovery after brain injury.

Psychology & Psychiatry

At which age are we happiest?

An evaluation of over 400 samples shows how subjective well-being develops over the course of a lifespan.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Childhood maltreatment predicts adult emotional difficulties

Have you ever wanted to convey a feeling but just couldn't find the right words? Millions of people struggle with a personality trait known as alexithymia, which means "no words for feelings." Individuals with alexithymia ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Actions speak louder than words when it comes to memory

Whether you're old or young, memory can be a challenge for all kinds of reasons, and most of us would welcome strategies to help improve our memory. Waterloo's researchers in psychology have been helping with this area of ...

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