Psychology and Aging

History
1986-present
Impact factor
3.118 (2010)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Why older people struggle to read fine print

(Medical Xpress)—Unique research into eye-movements of young and old people while reading discovers that word recognition patterns change as we grow older

Psychology & Psychiatry

Loneliness may be due to increasing aging population

Despite some claims that Americans are in the midst of a "loneliness epidemic," older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from previous generations—there just might be more of them, according to ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Subjective memory may be marker for cognitive decline

New research from the Center for Vital Longevity (CVL) at The University of Texas at Dallas suggests that subjective complaints about poor memory performance, especially in people over 60, could be a useful early marker for ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Effects of loneliness mimic aging process

The social pain of loneliness produces changes in the body that mimic the aging process and increase the risk of heart disease, reports a recent Cornell study published in Psychology and Aging (27:1). Changes in cardiovascular ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life

For parents worried that their teenager's narcissism is out of control, there's hope. New research from Michigan State University conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Enhancing cognition in older adults also changes personality

A program designed to boost cognition in older adults also increased their openness to new experiences, researchers report, demonstrating for the first time that a non-drug intervention in older adults can change a personality ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness

Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research ...

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