Neuroscience

Brain's astrocytes play starring role in long-term memory

Star-shaped cells called astrocytes help the brain establish long-lasting memories, Salk researchers have discovered. The new work adds to a growing body of evidence that astrocytes, long considered to be merely supportive ...

Neuroscience

How memories form and fade

Why is it that you can remember the name of your childhood best friend that you haven't seen in years yet easily forget the name of a person you just met a moment ago? In other words, why are some memories stable over decades, ...

Medical research

Epilepsy causes brain's defenses to collapse

What happens during an epileptic seizure? A recent study suggests that seizures occur after certain defense cells in the brain break down.

Medical research

New approaches to heal injured nerves

Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. A team from the Department of Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why we laugh when we know it's wrong

For the Batek people of the Malaysian peninsula rainforest, laughter can be dangerous. Within the system of taboos of these egalitarian hunter-gatherers, laughing in certain situations can cause storms, illness or even death. ...

Neuroscience

Using a matching game to study the language of conversations

Picture a set of cards with images of ordinary objects such as a kitchen knife or a red baseball hat arranged in a four-by-four grid. A friend sits across from you behind an opaque screen looking at another set of the exact ...

Neuroscience

Brain finds order amidst chaos

How does the brain find order amidst a sea of noise and chaos? Researchers at the EPFL Blue Brain Project have found the answer by using advanced simulation techniques to investigate the way neurons talk to each other. In ...

Neuroscience

New method classifies brain cells based on electrical signals

For decades, neuroscientists have relied on a technique for reading out electrical "spikes" of brain activity in live, behaving subjects that tells them very little about the types of cells they are monitoring. In a new study, ...

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