Neuroscience

Sleep frees up the hippocampus for new memories

Two regions of our brain are central for storing memories: the hippocampus and the neocortex. While the hippocampus is primarily responsible for learning new information and its short-term storage, the neocortex is able to ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Who really hit the basketball out of bounds?

The shot clock reads 5, and a win forces a game 7. Two hands outstretched as the players—one in royal blue and yellow, the other black—hurtle towards the edge of the court. The ball sails out of bounds, and the play ends. ...

Neuroscience

Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings

A state-of-the-art brain-machine interface created by UC San Francisco neuroscientists can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a virtual vocal tract—an anatomically detailed computer ...

Neuroscience

A new clue in the mystery of ALS, frontotemporal dementia

A special focus on rogue proteins may hold future promise in stopping the progression of nerve cell destruction in people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal dementia.

Medical research

How light triggers brain activity

Optogenetics uses light to control brain processes. It is based on light-controlled proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2, an ion channel that opens when it's exposed to light, thus activating cellular processes. In collaboration ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain

Our actions are driven by "internal states" such as anxiety, stress or thirst—which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. Not much is known about how such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, ...

Neuroscience

How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease

Zebrafish, in contrast to humans, have outstanding regenerative capacities: If brain cells are lost due to illness or injury, they will easily regrow from so-called progenitor cells. With sophisticated methods, researchers ...

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