World's first triple transplant patient OK

June 26, 2006

An Australian woman -- the world's first triple organ transplant patient -- is reportedly doing well after being given a second chance at life.

Leanne Myles of Cowra, Australia, was on her death bed following the failure of her liver, kidneys and pancreas, the Sydney Daily News reported.

At 19, she was diagnosed with a rare type of hepatitis that caused her body to attack itself. About six months ago she was placed on life support at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney and given only weeks to live.

Her condition deteriorated dramatically and the decision was made to perform three transplants, officials told the newspaper.

Surgeons spent three hours preparing the organs -- connecting the pancreas to the liver using blood vessels from the donor. And almost immediately after being transplanted the organs began to work, surgeons said.

Myles told the Daily News: "I live in a small country town. I don't want to travel the world or anything -- I just want to go home and enjoy being healthy, hopefully get married one day and have children."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Reduce your risk of falls

Related Stories

Reduce your risk of falls

September 16, 2014
If you are over 65 and have had a fall before, researchers at the University of Sydney think you should balance on one leg to brush your teeth, bend your knees to pack the dishwasher and take the stairs more often.

Thousands join March for Science to fight 'alternative facts' (Update 3)

April 22, 2017
Thousands of people joined a global March for Science on Saturday with Washington the epicenter of a movement to fight against what many see as an "assault on facts" by populist politicians.

New findings reported by Microbicide Trials Network researchers at HIV prevention meeting

April 17, 2012
An HIV prevention trial that pre-dates the shift to antiretroviral (ARV)-based approaches is nonetheless helping to answer some of the most relevant and topical questions the field is facing today. More than three years after ...

Australia says linking sausages to tobacco risk 'a farce'

October 27, 2015
One of the world's top meat exporters Australia Tuesday ridiculed a landmark UN report linking sausages and ham to cancer, saying it was "a farce" to suggest they could be as lethal as cigarettes.

Fighting drug resistance on Asia's malaria frontline

November 4, 2012
At a remote medical outpost near the jungle-blanketed Thai-Myanmar border, a villager pricks the finger of a feverish baby living on the frontline of the war on drug-resistant malaria.

Anti-vaccination nurses in Australia face punishment

October 20, 2016
Nurses and midwives promoting anti-vaccination messages in Australia could face punishment, the industry regulator warned Thursday, as the country tackles recent outbreaks of preventable diseases.

Recommended for you

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

New findings explain how UV rays trigger skin cancer

October 18, 2017
Melanoma, a cancer of skin pigment cells called melanocytes, will strike an estimated 87,110 people in the U.S. in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A fraction of those melanomas come from ...

First time mums with an epidural who lie down more likely to have a normal birth

October 18, 2017
Adopting a lying down position rather than being upright in the later stages of labour for first-time mothers who have had a low dose epidural leads to a higher chance of them delivering their baby without any medical intervention, ...

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

October 18, 2017
Scars may fade, but the skin remembers. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals that wounds or other harmful, inflammation-provoking experiences impart long-lasting memories to stem cells residing in the skin, ...

Nature or nurture? Innate social behaviors in the mouse brain

October 18, 2017
Adult male mice have a simple repertoire of innate, or instinctive, social behaviors: When encountering a female, a male mouse will try to mate with it, and when encountering another male, the mouse will attack. The animals ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.