Report: Ideal breakfast has ham, cheese

June 25, 2007

A scientific study of British students' eating habits has found eating ham and cheese for breakfast can significantly improve cognitive functioning.

The study headed up by psychology professor David Benton of Wales' Swansea University found the traditional German breakfast can aid in cognitive functions like memory and attention levels, The Sunday Times of London said.

"It is all down to the glucose release of the breakfast into the bloodstream. The slower the release, the better the pupils performed," Benton said of his study's findings.

Benton's group monitored the eating habits and cognitive performance of 6- and 7-year-olds to determine the effect of a well-balanced breakfast.

Benton's group also found meals with slow-releasing glucose levels helped children stay physically fit and curbed obesity by limiting one's appetite.

"The high protein in the breakfast will release into the system slowly, and therefore it will suppress the appetite for longer, and prevent children from snacking," he told the newspaper.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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