Halloween 'Ugly Teeth' are recalled

October 31, 2007

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Wednesday announced the recall of Halloween "Ugly Teeth" party favors because of excessive levels of lead paint.

The fake Halloween teeth -- manufactured in China and distributed in the United States by Amscan Inc. of Elmsford, N.Y. -- are painted white, black and orange with brown gums. They were sold nationwide through various retailers for about $2 in packages of eight teeth bearing UPC codes 0-48419-65002-7 and 0-48419-61663-4.

Consumers with questions can contact the company at 800-335-7585.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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