FDA OKs silver-coated breathing tube

November 8, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved for marketing a breathing tube coated with silver to be used by patients on ventilators.

FDA officials said the thin silver coating is known to have antimicrobial properties, thereby reducing the risk that patients on ventilators will acquire pneumonia while in the hospital.

The Agento endotracheal tube is intended for patients who must rely on a ventilator to breathe for 24 hours or more. Such patients are at risk of exposure to hospital-acquired bacteria that can accumulate on the tube or pass through the tube into their lungs, eventually causing a lung infection known as ventilator-associated pneumonia, the FDA said.

Fifteen percent of the patients on ventilators develop VAP every year and 26,000 die from the infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The device is manufactured by C.R. Bard Inc. of Murray Hill, N.J.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

Related Stories

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Straight from the patient's mouth: Videos can clearly state your end-of-life wishes

December 8, 2017
For years, Wendy Forman, considered how to make her wishes known if she became horribly ill and couldn't speak for herself.

New drug enables infants with genetic disorder to live longer, gain motor function

November 1, 2017
Infants with the most severe form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were more likely to show gains in motor function and were 47 percent more likely to survive without permanent assisted ventilation support when treated with ...

Child behavior associated with clinician sevoflurane exposure

November 22, 2017
(HealthDay)—Negative behavior among children undergoing elective ear, nose, and throat surgery is associated with higher mean and maximum sevoflurane concentrations in the anesthesiologist's breathing zone, according to ...

Restricting calories early on does not help acute lung injury patients on ventilators

February 7, 2012
Acute lung injury patients on ventilators who require a feeding tube have a similar number of ventilator-free hospital days and similar mortality rates if they receive a low-calorie feeding program initially followed by a ...

Study shows unassisted method works best to restore independent breathing in patients on ventilators

January 28, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Use of a device that supplies humidified oxygen is more effective than a technique that reduces positive airway pressure delivered to the lungs in helping patients who have been on a ventilator more than ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.