Researchers confirm genetic alteration that triggers prostate cancer in mice and man

January 28, 2008

A team of researchers led by Valeri Vasioukhin, Ph.D., and Peter Nelson, M.D., both investigators in the Human Biology Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, has confirmed that a molecular change found in human prostate cancers triggers the growth of prostate cancer in mice and in human cell lines. Their findings will be published Jan. 28 in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

A significant proportion of human prostate cancers carry a chromosomal rearrangement that results in the overexpression of the ETS transcription factor ERG, a protein that controls gene expression. Until now, the functional significance of this event has been poorly understood.

Studying prostate cells in transgenic mice, Vasioukhin, Nelson and colleagues at the Hutchinson Center and the University of Washington found that up-regulation of ERG transcript initiates cancer growth. They found a similar effect in human prostate cells. They hypothesize that up-regulation of ERG in human prostate cancer activates cell-invasion programs, causing the displacement of basal cells by neoplastic epithelium, or cancerous tissue.

As such, they suggest that ERG should be considered as a target for prostate-cancer prevention or early therapeutic intervention.

Source: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Explore further: Researchers identify a mechanism that fuels cancer cells' growth

Related Stories

Researchers identify a mechanism that fuels cancer cells' growth

November 14, 2018
Scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified sodium glucose transporter 2, or SGLT2, as a mechanism that lung cancer cells can utilize to obtain glucose, which is key to their survival and promotes ...

New kind of compound shows early promise against prostate cancer

October 23, 2018
A new type of molecule blocks the action of genes that drive the growth of therapy-resistant prostate cancer, a new study finds.

Distinguishing fatal prostate cancer from 'manageable' cancer now possible

October 18, 2018
Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy.

Scientists develop DNA molecule that may one day be used as 'vaccine' for prostate cancer

October 18, 2018
Researchers from City of Hope, a world-renowned comprehensive cancer center and independent biomedical research institution, have developed a synthetic DNA molecule that is programmed to jump-start the immune system to eradicate ...

Brain-derived compounds show surprising—and beneficial—results for cancer in lab studies

November 6, 2018
A lab team led by Nobel Prize winner Dr. Andrew Schally at the Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and the University of Miami showed that a synthetic compound based on a brain hormone spurred the growth of cancer cells ...

Can you cut your cancer risk by eating organic?

October 26, 2018
A new study out this week has shoppers wondering whether it's worth paying more for pesticide-free organic food.

Recommended for you

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

November 19, 2018
Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), ...

New drug discovery could halt spread of brain cancer

November 19, 2018
The tissues in our bodies largely are made of fluid. It moves around cells and is essential to normal body function.

New dual-action cancer-killing virus

November 19, 2018
Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system.

Use genetic data to predict the best time of day to give radiotherapy to breast cancer patients, say researchers

November 19, 2018
A new clinical study led by the University of Leicester and conducted in the HOPE clinical trials facility at Leicester's Hospitals has revealed the pivotal role that changing the time of day that a patient receives radiotherapy ...

New blood test detects early stage ovarian cancer

November 19, 2018
Research on a bacterial toxin first discovered in Adelaide has led to the development a new blood test for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer—a disease which kills over 1000 Australian women and 150,000 globally each ...

Scientists trained a computer to classify breast cancer tumors

November 19, 2018
Using technology similar to the type that powers facial and speech recognition on a smartphone, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have trained a computer to analyze breast ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.