Getting kids to eat vegetables

January 23, 2009 By Barbara Quinn

Several years ago, I did a study in graduate school to determine why some children like vegetables and many do not. Two findings emerged from my "research" with 6 and 7 year olds: Children who had opportunity to help grow and/or prepare vegetables liked to eat them. And even when moms prepared most of the meals, kids tended to copy how dad ate.

Today we are still trying to figure out kids and vegetables. A recent survey conducted for the Jolly Green Giant Corp. found that 25 of every 100 parents think it is more likely for their child to become president than to eat their recommended daily amount of vegetables (1 cup for toddlers, 2 to 3 cups for older children).

Here are some current suggestions from experts on how to get vegetables into our little darlings' daily diet:

• Be consistent. Junior will only learn that vegetables are a normal part of meals if vegetables are a normal part of meals. Place a serving on his plate but don't force him to eat. Most children will eventually try a bite.

• Be persistent. Studies show that a child may need to be exposed to a new food 8-15 times before she decides if she truly likes or dislikes it. Parents who calmly offer vegetables along with other foods can help a child gradually overcome their resistance.

• Play the rainbow game. Take your child food shopping and ask him to pick out different colored vegetables. Then encourage him to try one color each day of the week.

• Offer pint-sized pieces. Allow toddlers to practice their fine motor skills with soft-cooked beans, peas or chopped carrots.

• Sneak it in. Shred or puree nutrient-dense vegetables such as cauliflower or carrots into pasta sauce. Use pureed vegetables to thicken soups.

• Be a role model. Ouch. Remember that habits are caught more than they are taught. And if mom and dad don¹t eat vegetables, good luck getting junior to dive in.

• Eat meals together. Studies continue to show that children and teens who eat frequent meals with their families eat more fruits and vegetables (even dark green ones), and drink fewer soft drinks than those whose families are too busy to eat meals together.

• Consider convenience. Fresh vegetables are only best if they don't languish in the refrigerator for days and days before we eat them. On the other hand, nutrients in frozen vegetables are relatively stable for up to a year. Keep both on hand for little tykes. And consider planting a vegetable garden this spring ...

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(c) 2009, The Monterey County Herald (Monterey, Calif.).
Visit the Monterey County Herald's World Wide Web site at www.montereyherald.com/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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freethinking
1 / 5 (1) Jan 23, 2009
All my kids love their vegetables, but then again so do I. It always amazed me that other kids didnt. One thing though.... If my kids didnt eat their vegetables fast enough, I would steal it from their plates...... They should have use that as a suggestion... to get your kids to eat their vegetables, have their dad steal it off their plate. :)
Mauricio
not rated yet Jan 23, 2009
I bet that kids that do not watch tv eat their vegetables. But it is true that they do all what daddy does... Kids are awesome.
theEXxman
not rated yet Jan 24, 2009
How bout actually try cooking at home and don't just go to the local food joint and get it to go.
freethinking
1 / 5 (1) Jan 25, 2009
Maybe the headline should of read, Fathers necessary for Children to eat heathy. But that wouldnt be politically correct
Elyssa
not rated yet Jan 26, 2009

The food is the most fundamental part of our life for us to live but it%u2019s sad to say that although there is a increase production of food supply due to the new technologies develop by agricultural scientist for food production, there are more and more people get hungry in many parts of the world. Because many greedy business man that are holding their goods to supply in the market so that they can make the food prices more higher, that affect the prices of food. As a result many poor people cannot afford to buy it. Despite most fast food places seeing increases in revenue, Wendy%u2019s has decided to cut the breakfast menu from up to 475 of its stores. The company%u2019s CEO says it%u2019s trying to decrease spending by $60 million. Americans are taking out payday loans to cover basic expenses and flocking to dollar menus to save money on food. So it seems strange that Wendy%u2019s would reduce its menu at this point. The company plans to relaunch breakfast service in 2011. The problem I see is that customers will simply go somewhere else for breakfast, and those places will gain customer loyalty while Wendy%u2019s misses out on a portion of the market. To read or comment about this story, visit your payday loans source.

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