Are You Getting Enough Sleep? Why Women Struggle with Sleep Problems

March 18, 2009

Good sleep equals good health, says Raul Noriega, manager of the Comprehensive Epilepsy and Sleep Disorders Center at Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine. Yet more than half of women report problems with insomnia. According to the National Sleep Foundation, “women’s lack of sleep affects nearly every aspect of their time-pressed lives, leaving them late for work, stressed out, tired and with little time for friends.” What’s going on? There are several factors, Noriega says, and all relate to poor sleep hygiene.

1. Jolt of java
consumption has jumped dramatically, Noriega says. It’s like a . People drink coffee at night and stay up late watching TV or surfing the Internet. Then they need a jolt at 6 a.m. to get started for the day. Eventually, that takes a toll on the body. Remember, caffeine is a stimulant, so refrain from drinking it at least six hours before bed.

2. Stressed out
Women tend to worry, Noriega says. “Once your head hits the pillow, your only duty is to ,” he says. But some women find it hard to relax. “They start thinking about what they forgot to do, about the kids, work deadlines, unpaid bills, the stock market.”

3. Stay cool
Body temperature lowers about one degree during sleep. Working out too close to bedtime is counterproductive—it will take three hours to cool down enough for sleep to take place, Noriega explains. And, next time you’re tempted to check the clock and calculate how many hours of sleep you have left—don’t. Even a small amount of exertion consumes energy, which raises the body’s temperature, further delaying sleep.

4. The bottom line
Developing good can help you avoid relying on medication, Noriega says. For example, be sure to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. A bedtime ritual also can help. Thirty minutes before bed turn off , make the atmosphere calm, dim the lights, take a warm (not hot) shower. Then, read in bed for a maximum of 15 minutes, turn off the lights, close your eyes and relax.

Provided by Baylor Health Care System

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2 comments

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Waraich
not rated yet Mar 19, 2009
disharmony in family life, being a single, unsatisfied over the school performance of kids, a habit of going to bed only during late night for studies/work, serious health issue of spouse/kids, psychiatric disease i.e. depression may be stronly associated with insomnia.
E_L_Earnhardt
not rated yet Mar 19, 2009
"WHITE SOUND" is an old sleep aid and is worthy of new research!

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