Lifestyle interventions in the prevention and treatment of cancer

September 24, 2009

There is clear evidence that lifestyle choices affect the incidence and treatment of cancer, according to a study published in the current issue of American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM).

The article "Lifestyle Interventions in the Prevention and Treatment of " looks at recent research on the five most common forms of cancer (lung, colorectal, breast, prostate and skin) and how some risk factors for these cancers can be lifestyle based and therefore controllable through alterations in human behavior. A Webinar based on the article will be moderated by James M. Rippe, MD, Editor-in-Chief of AJLM, and presented by lead author Clarence H. Brown III, MD, president and CEO of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando. Participants can earn 1 CME while learning about:

  • lifestyle interventions that have been shown to be effective in preventing cancers
  • recent evidence for specific lifestyle behaviors for specific cancers
  • how to counsel patients for appropriate lifestyle behaviors to lower
"While a universal cure for all types of cancer is still not in the foreseeable future," write the authors in the article, "changes in - adhering to a , regular exercise, and avoiding smoking and excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation - can decrease the incidence of cancer."

Source: SAGE Publications

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Hatmon
not rated yet Sep 24, 2009
People can't even follow a lifestyle of non smoking in efforts to avoid cancer. What chance do they have in further fine tuning of their lifestyle. People think only ahead in the short term. The possibility of disease at some distant point in the future is irrelevant to a big rare steak with a couple of beers followed by a big fat cigar this evening.
E_L_Earnhardt
not rated yet Sep 25, 2009
Do we ever consider that the treatments to accelerate mitosis, (growth), in plants could be doing the same thing in OUR cells when we eat or smoke them?

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