Eating fish has no effect on health of large intestine

October 8, 2009

It appears that eating more fish has no effect on the health of the large intestine. Neither was there any difference between eating salmon and cod. In other words, there are no additional indications that fish consumption can help to lower the risk of developing cancer of the large intestine; whereas previous research did seem to indicate this.

On 2 October, Gerda Pot received a doctorate for her research on this topic at Wageningen University, The Netherlands, in the Human Nutrition department.

For this research, 140 people ate two extra portions of or cod every week for six months. Biopsies were performed on the subjects; tissue samples taken from the intestines were compared with samples from 70 people who had not eaten extra , to see if there had been any changes. There were no differences in intestinal cell division or cell mortality between the people who ate extra fish and those who did not. This could partly be explained by the fact that all the subjects were fish eaters before they took part in the investigation.

The consumption of fish is not the only potential factor for reducing the risk of of the large intestine. Other factors - a moderate consumption of red meat and alcohol, reducing the amount of abdominal body fat and sufficient exercise - can also contribute to reducing the risk of cancer of the large intestine. Because reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, it remains important to eat fish twice a week.

Provided by Wageningen University

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

OregonWind
not rated yet Oct 08, 2009
"Eating fish has no effect on health of large intestine"

I am not sure how useful this study was compared to the previous one. It seems that some other factors must be considered to make better judgment between this study and the previous one showing opposite results. Why should I trust that this study is better done or more accurate? Forgive me here, I am a physicist and I always was puzzled by theses medical studies which often contradict each other.
mongander
not rated yet Oct 09, 2009
how about ingrown toenail?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.